Oct. 8th, 2006

gemfyre: (Meerkat)




I just found this.
Phantom when she was an itty-bitty teensy-weensy teeny-tiny kitten! *squees*
gemfyre: (Meerkat)




I just found this.
Phantom when she was an itty-bitty teensy-weensy teeny-tiny kitten! *squees*
gemfyre: (Tawny Frogmouths)
Magpie (Gymnorhina tibicen)

Australian magpies have a musical warbling call. Noted New Zealand poet Denis Glover wrote "quardle oodle ardle wardle doodle, the magpies say". In contrast, young magpies squawk almost continuously. - From Wikipedia.

I used to dislike magpies because of their swooping habits (I had one draw blood from my scalp one time). But then I worked at a bird rehabilitation centre and fell in love.


Magpie


This magpie landed on my picnic table at a park in Perth.

Just this afternoon I had a "conversation" with a magpie. I whistle and they reply. The one I met this afternoon was an accomplished mimic (I have heard tales of magpies learning to whistle "Waltzing Matilda"). Among his repetoire was the call of a white-tailed black cockatoo, barking dogs and mixed calls of various small birds in the area. I find if I "talk" to the magpies, they generally won't swoop at me.

I find their most alarming behaviour to be their territorial fights among each other. Often you will see a young magpie on it's back being harassed by an adult. Sometimes the juvenille lays that way for quite a while and you wonder if it's dead. Apparently this is just part of mum & dad telling bub it's time to find his own turf. I don't blame them, the incessant squawk of a hungry young magpie is enough to drive any parent insane.

The magpie has recently been split into eight sub-species, which makes things a lot more confusing than back when you simply had "white-backed" and "black-backed" magpies. The white-backed seems to dominate around the Perth area.

Bobtail (Tiliqua rugosa)

The Bobtail has many different names depending on what part of Australia you hail from. Around Perth they are Bobtails. Elsewhere they may be Bluetongues (they are closely related to the smoother scaled Bluetongue lizard), Stumpies (or Stump-tailed Skinks), Shinglebacks, Sleepy Lizards (due to their lack of speed), Bobtail Goannas (a misnomer, as they are actually a skink) or Two-headed Lizards.


Bobtail



The Bobtails is reasonably common in any area of bush in Perth. They are plentiful at the Murdoch University campus (I once saw one being swooped by a Red Wattlebird - I have never seen a Bobtail move faster than on that day). Once you get out of the city they're a dime a dozen. I'm currently living in a country town 200km S/E of Perth. I have seen them in town, but get on a gravel road and it becomes bobtail slalom. Many lose their lives to road traffic - roads are warm for basking and bobtails are unfortunately slow.

When approached they will open their gaping mouths and reveal a purplish-blue tongue along with a hiss. The display doesn't get more threatening than this.



gemfyre: (Tawny Frogmouths)
Magpie (Gymnorhina tibicen)

Australian magpies have a musical warbling call. Noted New Zealand poet Denis Glover wrote "quardle oodle ardle wardle doodle, the magpies say". In contrast, young magpies squawk almost continuously. - From Wikipedia.

I used to dislike magpies because of their swooping habits (I had one draw blood from my scalp one time). But then I worked at a bird rehabilitation centre and fell in love.


Magpie


This magpie landed on my picnic table at a park in Perth.

Just this afternoon I had a "conversation" with a magpie. I whistle and they reply. The one I met this afternoon was an accomplished mimic (I have heard tales of magpies learning to whistle "Waltzing Matilda"). Among his repetoire was the call of a white-tailed black cockatoo, barking dogs and mixed calls of various small birds in the area. I find if I "talk" to the magpies, they generally won't swoop at me.

I find their most alarming behaviour to be their territorial fights among each other. Often you will see a young magpie on it's back being harassed by an adult. Sometimes the juvenille lays that way for quite a while and you wonder if it's dead. Apparently this is just part of mum & dad telling bub it's time to find his own turf. I don't blame them, the incessant squawk of a hungry young magpie is enough to drive any parent insane.

The magpie has recently been split into eight sub-species, which makes things a lot more confusing than back when you simply had "white-backed" and "black-backed" magpies. The white-backed seems to dominate around the Perth area.

Bobtail (Tiliqua rugosa)

The Bobtail has many different names depending on what part of Australia you hail from. Around Perth they are Bobtails. Elsewhere they may be Bluetongues (they are closely related to the smoother scaled Bluetongue lizard), Stumpies (or Stump-tailed Skinks), Shinglebacks, Sleepy Lizards (due to their lack of speed), Bobtail Goannas (a misnomer, as they are actually a skink) or Two-headed Lizards.


Bobtail



The Bobtails is reasonably common in any area of bush in Perth. They are plentiful at the Murdoch University campus (I once saw one being swooped by a Red Wattlebird - I have never seen a Bobtail move faster than on that day). Once you get out of the city they're a dime a dozen. I'm currently living in a country town 200km S/E of Perth. I have seen them in town, but get on a gravel road and it becomes bobtail slalom. Many lose their lives to road traffic - roads are warm for basking and bobtails are unfortunately slow.

When approached they will open their gaping mouths and reveal a purplish-blue tongue along with a hiss. The display doesn't get more threatening than this.



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